Digital Responsibility

Teaching digital responsibility in the current time, can be a daunting yet necessary aspect of any teacher that incorporates technology into the classroom. Teaching students about their responsibility as both a consumer and producer of online creations, it is important to teach the benefits and drawbacks of using technology. The “issues with digital citizenship” was a good visual representation of how the core issues of technology can branch out into even more and more issues. One important aspect that we teachers need to focus on is that many online tools market products to children. As a Family and Consumer Sciences teacher, I often go over how foods and other markets advertise to younger demographics. It is also important to know that cookies and algorithms are used to base advertisements on the websites that kids are looking at. Students have greater opportunities to buy digital content for games or social media by just clicking on a few buttons. Therefore, it is important to teach students to be financially responsible online.

The article “On Instagram, 11,696 Examples of How Hate Thrives on Social Media” shows the powerful effects of how violence, authenticity, religion can be misused on social media (Sheera Frenkel, Mike Isaac and Kate Conger, 2018). Students often feel as though they want to be a part of something bigger than themselves, even if it brings someone else down in the process. Following the hashtag “jewsdid911” being followed and continue shows how misinformation and hate is spread throughout the world. Most students are now familiar with the concept of “fake news”, but many don’t connect that to fake post or clickbait as well. It is our role as educators to teach critical thinking skills and how they relate to information they see online.  Also teaching them how anonymity is no excuse for hostility. Keeping these lessons online is important for teachers to consider when educating students on the problems in the online world.

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